Why Do All Elite Swimmers Use a Curvilinear Stroke Pattern?

Here’s the short answer: The shortest distance between two points is a straight line. If you pull straight back underwater, your arm and hand will travel the least distance from front to back. If you can make your underwater pull distance longer, by adding an S-curve to it, you give yourself more opportunity to exert more backward force which can help you swim faster. A longer pull is a stronger pull.

But let’s be clear: we mean “longer” as in distance, not in time. Taking a long time to pull can be a slower way to swim, as Sheila explains fully in her books and introduces in these posts about gliding.

And of course there’s a lot more to the short answer! Here’s part of the longer answer in this passage from Sheila’s new book Swim Speed Strokes:

Swim Speed Strokes by Sheila TaorminaIn the early 1970s, 20 years after Doc Counsilman’s first suspicions about lift and drag were raised, he pre­sented his own research findings to the swim community. Using photos of the underwater stroke patterns of current swim stars—many from his Indiana University team, including Mark Spitz—Doc showed the curvilinear pull patterns (in all strokes) and offered an explanation as to why the best swimmers were stroking this way.

Doc first explained the limitations of Newton’s Third Law as it applied to swimming. He said that when a swimmer exerts a back-pushing force on the water, the water begins to move, and once the water is set in motion it offers less resistance to the swimmer. Doc explained the swimmer’s hand/arm would have to continually accelerate to keep up with the moving water. Accelerating in this manner, stroke after stroke, would be exhausting and an inefficient use of the swimmer’s energy.

Doc believed that Newton’s Third Law was effective for pushing water back in short increments but not longer increments such as the full length of the underwater stroke. He believed that by moving the hand/arm to an adjacent plane of water either to the side, below, or above the backward-directing path, the swimmer would find slower-moving or “still” water and could effectively apply Newton’s Third Law again.

Swim Speed Secrets sheila taormina sculling pattern

Sculling drills work to develop lift and feel.

This part of Doc’s explanation was easy for coaches to accept since it pre­served most of the commonly held action-reaction beliefs of the time; however, the second part of Doc’s presentation caused a stir. He explained that the lat­eral and vertical stroking patterns were not just a necessary evil for the swim­mer to maneuver their way to a plane of still water, but rather that propulsive power was actually generated by these movements—perhaps even more pro­pulsive power than drag could offer. Doc then explained Bernoulli’s Principle and introduced the concept of lift to the swimming world for the first time in the sport’s history. His first published article on the topic was “The Application of Bernoulli’s Principle to Human Propulsion in Water” (1970).

Doc’s theory became known in swimming circles as the S-Pull pattern. He explained that just as a boat driven by a propeller is faster than a boat driven by a paddle, so too is a swimmer who navigates the hands/arms like a propel­ler (in an S-curve path) through the water faster than a swimmer who uses the hands/arms like a paddle pushing straight back.

As you might guess by continuously falling world records in swimming since 1970, there’s a lot more to this story. Doc’s research into swimming was complemented by Cecil Colwin and refined by Ernie Maglischo. In her new book Swim Speed Strokes, Sheila Taormina offers an overview of how Colwin and Maglischo changed how the sport things about swimming stroke physics–and what it means for swimmers today.

Sheila Taormina’s Swim Speed Series reveals the world’s fastest way to swim. Both books are available in bookstores, swim and tri shops, from the publisher VeloPress, and from online book retailers.

Swim Speed Secrets for Swimmers and Triathletes book coverSwim Speed Workouts for Swimmers and TriathletesSwim Speed Strokes by Sheila Taormina

Swim Speed Secrets reveals the swimming technique used by the world’s fastest swimmers.

Swim Speed Workouts provides waterproof workout cards, drills, and training plan so swimmers can get in the pool and learn the fastest way to swim.

Swim Speed Strokes shows how to master elite technique in all four competitive swimming strokes.

Sheila Taormina is a 4-time Olympian, gold medalist, ITU triathlon world champion, and internationally recognized swimming coach. Learn more about Sheila here or at sheilat.com.

Laura Sogar’s Favorite Breaststroke Drill: Breast Arms, Flutter Kick

Laura Sogar is the 2013 NCAA Division I champion, 2012 U.S. Open champion, and 2012 world championships (shortcourse meters) silver medalist in the 200 breaststroke.

Laura SogarOne of Laura’s favorite drills is breaststroke arms with flutter kick. In this drill, swimmers pull with breaststroke arms, and flutter kick (freestyle kick) behind.

Laura likes this drill because it helps her work on her catch and helps her feel the connection between her chest and hips as she moves her core forward on the short axis. Laura also appreciates how this drill trains a fast tempo into her stroke.Swim Speed Strokes Laura Sogar breast arms flutter kick

To do the drill, keep a constant, uninterrupted flutter kick behind you during every phase of the pull.

Sheila Taormina’s Swim Speed Series reveals the world’s fastest way to swim. Both books are available in bookstores, swim and tri shops, from the publisher VeloPress, and from online book retailers.

Swim Speed Secrets for Swimmers and Triathletes book coverSwim Speed Workouts for Swimmers and TriathletesSwim Speed Strokes by Sheila Taormina

Swim Speed Secrets reveals the swimming technique used by the world’s fastest swimmers.

Swim Speed Workouts provides waterproof workout cards, drills, and training plan so swimmers can get in the pool and learn the fastest way to swim.

Swim Speed Strokes shows how to master elite technique in all four competitive swimming strokes.

Sheila Taormina is a 4-time Olympian, gold medalist, ITU triathlon world champion, and internationally recognized swimming coach. Learn more about Sheila here or at sheilat.com.

What is “feel for the water”? Sheila Taormina explains.

The best swimmers in the world are masters at feeling the water. Feeling or “holding” the water in order to gain traction and move the body forward is critical to swimming success, yet can be a difficult concept to grasp and apply.

Aaron Peirsol Swim Speed Strokes

Aaron Peirsol can’t see his arm or leg position, but he knows where they are in the stroke.

Coaches are even divided as to whether or not a feel for the water can be taught. I wholeheartedly believe it can be and know the impact that great photos can have on turning this concept from abstract to understand­able. I took care to ensure the swim strokes in this book were photographed from a variety of unique angles to give readers a glimpse into this mysteri­ous world.

Describing feel can get so abstract that coaches are oftentimes heard commenting that the greatest swimmers look as “one with the water.”

What the heck does that mean? How can we learn to do it, too?

The strokes of the best swimmers are fluid and look effortless. They seem to swim using some kind of X factor. The X is not abstract, nor is it a gift handed out by fate. It can be learned. Our study of fluid dynamics and stroke mechanics reveals what swim­mers must do to add the X factor in their strokes.

The X Factor In Swimming: A Feel For The Water

That X factor involves what in swimming is called a feel for the water. Feel is also referred to as an athlete’s “hold” on the water—the ability to gain trac­tion on a fluid and translate it into forward movement. We all are subject to lift and drag in the water. How do elite swimmers feel when they interact with these forces? Do they feel them like everyone else, or do they have a different, gifted, sensory function?

Elite swimmers do not feel lift and drag differently. Lift and drag are simply felt as resistance or pressure on the limb. You can press your hand/arm in any direction on the water and feel the resistance. There is no secret to it. How­ever, elite swimmers do have sharpened kinesthetic and proprioceptive abili­ties, which allow them to feel how the force they exert against the resistance translates to speed in the water, as well as when the resistance can be used to propel themselves forward.

Kinesthesia is the ability to feel movements of the limbs and the body, and proprioception is the ability to sense the position and location of the body and its parts. These two sensory skills account for the fluidity and almost effortless-looking nature of elite swimmers’ strokes. Having kinesthetic and proprioceptive abilities may be a gift that some swimmers naturally have, but these can be developed in any athlete through deliberate practice.

Let’s look at what swimmers must do to develop these heightened abilities, so they can put the X factor in their strokes.

Sheila explains the path to a better feel for the water in her book, but here’s a very short summary that will give you the idea.

Develop swimming kinesthetic ability by:

  • Maximizing the surface area of your limbs
  • Holding the proper amount of muscle tension in those limbs

It won’t do you much good to develop kinesthetic abilities only to then press on the water in the wrong direction. Your hand/arm must face back on the water throughout the curvilinear path in such a way that the resultant forces of lift and drag propel you forward. Hav­ing the proprioceptive ability to recognize when your limb is in the correct position is critical.

Develop swimming proprioceptive ability by:

  • Effective drills (Learn drills from the Swim Speed Series drill videos here.)
  • Periodically stop swimming midstroke, freeze-frame your hand/arm during the pull, and look back to see if your stroking paddle faces back on the water. If not, adjust and consciously work to memorize what it feels like to do it right.

When it comes to a masterful hold on the water, there is one other stroking feature that elite swimmers share: hand acceleration.

Elite swimmers’ hand speed is slowest during the catch and increases as they progress through the stroke, while less proficient swimmers stroke with constant, unchanging hand velocity. Hand speed is directly related to hand force; faster hand speed translates to increased force. Therefore, elite swimmers’ hand force increases as they progress through the stroke cycle. You can learn this too and drills can help.

[Watch Olympic gold medalist Peter Vanderkaay demonstrate a feel for the water drill called the Tornado Drill (or Vortices Drill)]

Sheila Taormina’s Swim Speed Series reveals the world’s fastest way to swim. Both books are available in bookstores, swim and tri shops, from the publisher VeloPress, and from online book retailers.

Swim Speed Secrets for Swimmers and Triathletes book coverSwim Speed Workouts for Swimmers and TriathletesSwim Speed Strokes by Sheila Taormina

Swim Speed Secrets reveals the swimming technique used by the world’s fastest swimmers.

Swim Speed Workouts provides waterproof workout cards, drills, and training plan so swimmers can get in the pool and learn the fastest way to swim.

Swim Speed Strokes shows how to master elite technique in all four competitive swimming strokes.

Sheila Taormina is a 4-time Olympian, gold medalist, ITU triathlon world champion, and internationally recognized swimming coach. Learn more about Sheila here or at sheilat.com.

Lift vs. Drag: Which Matters Most to Swimming Speed?

Swim Speed Strokes SSST_600x315_pulloutIn her book Swim Speed Secrets, Sheila Taormina makes the case that swimmers should focus their attention on the one part of swimming that matters most to swimming fast: the underwater pull.

She provides the example of “Tarzan”, Johnny Weissmuller, the Michael Phelps of his generation and one of the most dominant swimmers of all time. Weissmuller swam using the body position considered fastest during his time: he swam freestyle with his head fully out of the water. And he set world records doing it.

[See Olympic swimmer Peter Vanderkaay demonstrate the Tarzan Drill from Swim Speed Secrets and Swim Speed Workouts.]

Sheila says in her book that Weissmuller’s swimming form shows that the drag created by poor body positioning is not as critical to fast swimming as the thing Weissmuller got right: his strong underwater pull.

In her new book Swim Speed Strokes, Sheila explores the contributions that lift and drag make to the underwater pull in all four swimming strokes.

Two ideas drive 90 percent of swim propulsion theory and discussion. These concepts are also fundamental to aerodynamics and flight. They are drag and lift.

Here are several ways to explain drag:

  • Drag is the resistance a fluid has to being pushed aside.
  • Drag is the force on an object that resists its motion through a fluid.
  • Drag is a force that works parallel to the flow direction of a fluid (parallel here simply means “head-on”).

[cont'd]

The easiest way to understand lift is to consider an example with which we are all familiar: airplanes flying.

This example will give us a visual image, and once we have an idea of how lift works on a plane, we can better visualize its role in the swim stroke.

An airplane gets off the ground because of a force called lift. The physics behind flying is quite complicated, but two basic conditions required for lift force can be applied to the swimming stroke. The first is the orientation, or angle, of the airplane wings. The wings are pitched up during takeoff. In phys­ics this is called the angle of attack. For lift to occur there must be some angle/pitch to the wings and a pressure imbalance between the bottom of the wing and the top.

[cont'd]

So which matters more to swimmers? Pushing back on the water (drag) or changing the pitch of the arm like a wing (lift)?

If you’ve done a fist drill (swimming with hands balled into fists), you know that drag’s awfully important.

But if you’ve done a sculling drill, you know that lift is important, too.

Swim Speed Secrets sheila taormina sculling pattern

Sculling patterns

In her book Swim Speed Strokes, Sheila Taormina offers an interesting overview of the swimming theories that dominated the sport from the 1940s on. She explains how the sport has been informed by legendary coaches like Doc Counsilman (a proponent of lift), Cecil Colwin (vortices and lift), and Ernie Maglischo (drag first, then lift).

Then she explains the two simple steps that guarantee a swimmer isn’t missing out on a stronger underwater pull.

Sheila Taormina’s Swim Speed Series reveals the world’s fastest way to swim. The Series is are available in bookstores, swim and tri shops, from the publisher VeloPress, and from online book retailers.

Swim Speed Secrets for Swimmers and Triathletes book coverSwim Speed Workouts for Swimmers and TriathletesSwim Speed Strokes by Sheila Taormina

Swim Speed Secrets reveals the swimming technique used by the world’s fastest swimmers.

Swim Speed Workouts provides waterproof workout cards, drills, and training plan so swimmers can get in the pool and learn the fastest way to swim.

Swim Speed Strokes shows how to master elite technique in all four competitive swimming strokes.

Sheila Taormina is a 4-time Olympian, gold medalist, ITU triathlon world champion, and internationally recognized swimming coach. Learn more about Sheila here or at sheilat.com.

Roll Call! Who Are the Elite Swimmers Featured in Swim Speed Strokes?

Alright, let’s get something straight. Sheila Taormina has one heck of a Rolodex.

The people at VeloPress, her book publisher, have made jokes that if they need to get in touch with any Olympic athlete, they can just ask Sheila to open up her Olympics Yellow Pages.

And we are positively giddy over the swimmers Sheila asked for help in her new book Swim Speed Strokes. They generously donated their time to show us their winning swim technique and share it with you.

Get to know the swimmers in Swim Speed Strokes.

Elizabeth Beisel ELIZABETH BEISEL won a silver medal in the 400-meter IM and bronze in the 200-meter backstroke at the 2012 Olympics. She is an NCAA Division I champion in the 200 backstroke (2012) and a world champion in the 400 IM (2011).
BEST TIMES
200-yard backstroke: 1:49.82
400-yard IM: 3:58.84
400-meter IM (LCM): 4:31.27

 

 

 

Nicolas FinkNICOLAS FINK is a 2013 world championships finalist in the 100 breaststroke, and he placed second in the 100-yard breaststroke at the 2014 Division I NCAA championships.
BEST TIMES
100-yard breaststroke: 51.48
200-yard breaststroke: 1:51.92
100-meter breaststroke (LCM): 1:00.10

 

 

 

Rowdy Gaines

ROWDY GAINES set 10 world records between 1978–84 and won three gold medals at the 1984 Olympics. He is currently NBC’s swimming commentator for the Olympics, alongside Dan Hicks, and is a masters swimming world-record holder.
BEST TIMES
50-meter freestyle (LCM): 22.96 (1980)
100-meter freestyle (LCM): 49.36 (1981)
200-meter freestyle (LCM): 1:48.93 (1982)

 

 

 

Andrew GemmellANDREW GEMMELL won silver at the 2009 world championships in the 10K open-water event, earning the title of 2009 U.S. Open Water Swimmer of the Year. He also won the 1500-meter freestyle in the pool at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials, earning a spot on the 2012 Olympic team.
BEST TIMES
500-yard freestyle: 4:17.75
1650-yard freestyle: 14:41.86
1500-meter freestyle (LCM): 14:52.19

 

 

Ariana KukorsARIANA KUKORS is the world-record holder in the 200-meter IM (long-course meters). She is a U.S. Olympian and world champion and was named American Swimmer of the Year in 2009 by Swimming World Magazine.
BEST TIMES
200-meter IM (LCM): 2:06.15

 

 

 

 

Melanie MargalisMELANIE MARGALIS won bronze at the 2013 World University Games in the 200-meter IM and placed second at the 2014 NCAA Division I Championships in the 200-yard IM.
BEST TIMES
200-yard IM: 1:52.64
400-yard IM: 4:00.30

 

 

 

 

Vladimir Morozov freestyle sprint swim techniqueVLADIMIR MOROZOV is an NCAA champion, world champion, and 2012 Olympic bronze medalist. He holds the NCAA record in the 100-yard freestyle and turned in the fastest 50-yard freestyle split in history at the 2013 NCAA Division I Championships.
BEST TIMES
100-yard freestyle: 40.76
50-meter freestyle (LCM): 21.47
100-meter freestyle (LCM): 47.62

 

 

 

Aaron PeirsolAARON PEIRSOL is the world-record holder in the 100-meter and 200-meter backstroke (long-course meters). He has competed for the United States at three Olympics—2000, 2004, and 2008—winning five gold medals and two silver medals.
BEST TIMES
100-meter backstroke (LCM): 51.94
200-meter backstroke (LCM): 1:51.92

 

 

 

Doug ReynoldsDOUG REYNOLDS is a Division I NCAA All-American and Southeastern Conference champion known for his powerful underwater dolphin kick off the walls.
BEST TIMES
100-yard butterfly: 45.92

 

 

 

 

Laura SogarLAURA SOGAR is the 2013 NCAA Division I champion, 2012 U.S. Open champion, and 2012 world championships (short-course meters) silver medalist in the 200 breaststroke.
BEST TIMES
100-yard breaststroke: 58.32
200-yard breaststroke: 2:05.04

 

 

 

 

Rebecca Soni breaststroke swim techniqueREBECCA SONI is the only woman in history to win the 200-meter breaststroke at back-to-back Olympics. She won gold en route to world records at the 2008 and 2012 Games. She has held world records in the 100- and 200-meter breaststroke events in both short-course and long-course during her career, and is a six-time NCAA champion.
BEST TIMES
100-meter breaststroke (LCM): 1:04.84 (1:02.70 SCM)
200-meter breaststroke (LCM): 2:19.59 (2:14.57 SCM)

 

Peter VanderkaayPETER VANDERKAAY has competed for the United States in three Olympics—2004, 2008, and 2012—winning four medals. He is a five-time NCAA champion, three-time world champion, and the American-record holder in the 500-yard freestyle.
BEST TIMES
500-yard freestyle: 4:08.54
400-meter freestyle (LCM): 3:44.69

 

 

 

Ashley WhitneyASHLEY WHITNEY is a 1996 Olympic gold medalist in the 4 × 200-meter freestyle relay and a former U.S. national team member for open-water swimming.
BEST TIMES
200-yard freestyle: 1:47.10
500-yard freestyle: 4:44.30

 

 

 

 

Sheila Taormina’s Swim Speed Series reveals the world’s fastest way to swim. Both books are available in bookstores, swim and tri shops, from the publisher VeloPress, and from online book retailers.

Swim Speed Secrets for Swimmers and Triathletes book coverSwim Speed Workouts for Swimmers and TriathletesSwim Speed Strokes by Sheila Taormina

Swim Speed Secrets reveals the swimming technique used by the world’s fastest swimmers.

Swim Speed Workouts provides waterproof workout cards, drills, and training plan so swimmers can get in the pool and learn the fastest way to swim.

Swim Speed Strokes shows how to master elite technique in all four competitive swimming strokes.

Sheila Taormina is a 4-time Olympian, gold medalist, ITU triathlon world champion, and internationally recognized swimming coach. Learn more about Sheila here or at sheilat.com.

Which Arm Is Swimming Which Stroke? A Quiz for Swimmers and Triathletes

Swim Speed Secrets for Swimmers and Triathletes book coverMy first book, Swim Speed Secrets, focused solely on the freestyle stroke and the vital elements of the underwater pull—the few things swimmers cannot forgo if they want to get faster. I knew that the vital elements in freestyle are also vital and present in all strokes, but even I was shocked at the extent to which this is the case.

Swim Speed Strokes by Sheila TaorminaMy intent with my new book Swim Speed Strokes was to photograph the underwater mechanics in each of the four competitive swimming strokes, including the most critical elements of it, so swimmers could learn from the sport’s icons in their stroke specialty.

As each photo session ended, however, and the images downloaded, I saw a striking resemblance among the strokes. I zoomed in on images—focusing on just one arm during a particular phase of the stroke—and noted that the strokes are not only similar, but they are indistinguishable from one another.

To show what I mean, here is a fun test:

Each of the four strokes—butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke, and freestyle—is represented in the photos on page 7 (below). Each photo captures the stroke during the catch phase of the pull. The arms you see in these photos are the arms of world-record holders swimming the stroke naturally. None of the photos were staged.

Can you match the photo with the stroke? Take a close look and really give this some thought. (The answers are at the very bottom of this article.)

Swim Speed Strokes arm quizHow did you do? Not an easy test, right? If I wasn’t the one to select the photos I’m not sure how I would do. It’s a bugger. Don’t worry about how you scored. The key is that you understand through this example how working on the mechanics of any one stroke reinforces the other strokes. I hope this inspires you at practice.

Many swimmers think of themselves as one-stroke, or maybe two-stroke, specialists. The majority of triathletes stick to freestyle, and competitive swimmers slip to the back of the lane at practice when the coach gives a set that involves their weaker strokes. We fall into the trap of thinking, I’m just not naturally good at that stroke, so why try?

The stealth message in Swim Speed Strokes is that putting forth effort in your non-primary strokes will do you more good than you can imagine. Consider this quote from a triathlete who took a backstroke clinic I coached in the winter of 2014:

“What stunned me is that learning the correct catch and grab for the backstroke translated into my FINALLY figuring out the catch and grab for freestyle. Who knew that after all these years, it would take flipping me onto my back to get the most important part of the freestyle stroke?”

This triathlete now deliberately practices backstroke rather than using it as a stroke to take a rest.

Sheila Taormina’s Swim Speed Series reveals the world’s fastest way to swim. All three books in the series are available in bookstores, swim and tri shops, from the publisher VeloPress, and from online book retailers.

Swim Speed Secrets for Swimmers and Triathletes book coverSwim Speed Workouts for Swimmers and TriathletesSwim Speed Strokes by Sheila Taormina

Swim Speed Secrets reveals the swimming technique used by the world’s fastest swimmers.

Swim Speed Workouts provides waterproof workout cards, drills, and training plan so swimmers can get in the pool and learn the fastest way to swim.

Swim Speed Strokes shows how to master elite technique in all four competitive swimming strokes.

Sheila Taormina is a 4-time Olympian, gold medalist, ITU triathlon world champion, and internationally recognized swimming coach. Learn more about Sheila here or at sheilat.com.

ANSWERS: A) backstroke B) freestyle C) breastroke D) butterfly

Swimming more than one stroke will make you a better swimmer in your preferred stroke. Get started with Swim Speed Strokes.

Master Elite Swimming Technique with Swim Speed Strokes

Swim Speed Strokes by Sheila TaorminaIn her best-selling book Swim Speed Secrets, 4-time Olympian and gold medalist Sheila Taormina revealed the freestyle swimming technique used by the world’s fastest swimmers.

Now in Swim Speed Strokes, Taormina shows swimmers and triathletes how to swim their best in all four swimming strokes—butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke, and freestyle. Swim Speed Strokes is now shipping online preorders! Look for the book in bookstores, swim shops, and online in early September.

Using crystal-clear photographs and her engaging, straightforward style, Coach Taormina explains the science behind power and speed in the water, explores the elements common to every stroke, and examines stroke technique in detail in individual stroke chapters.

Swim Speed Strokes features elite swimmers and Olympians including Peter Vanderkaay, Rebecca Soni, Aaron Peirsol, Rowdy Gaines, Ashley Whitney, Vlad Morozov, Ariana Kukors, Andrew Gemmell, Laura Sogar, Nicolas Fink, Elizabeth Beisel, Doug Reynolds, and Melanie Margalis.

Stunning over- and underwater photographs unveil the winning technique that has carried these athletes to the top of their sport. Whether you want to master every stroke or simply improve on your best one, Swim Speed Strokes will get you there and make you the strongest swimmer you can be.

Swim Speed Strokes for Swimmers and Triathletes
Foreword by Rowdy Gaines
Paperback. Full-color photographs throughout.
7″ x 9″, 224 pp., $21.95, 9781937715212

Download a pdf preview of Swim Speed Strokes at www.velopress.com.

Find Swim Speed Strokes in your local bookstore, tri or swim shop, or from these online retailers:

VeloPress.com
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Chapters/Indigo
your local bookseller
TriSports.com

Sheila Taormina’s Swim Speed Series reveals the world’s fastest way to swim. The series is available in bookstores, swim and tri shops, from the publisher VeloPress, and from online book retailers.

Swim Speed Secrets for Swimmers and Triathletes book coverSwim Speed Workouts for Swimmers and TriathletesSwim Speed Strokes by Sheila Taormina

Swim Speed Secrets reveals the swimming technique used by the world’s fastest swimmers.

Swim Speed Workouts provides waterproof workout cards, drills, and training plan so swimmers can get in the pool and learn the fastest way to swim.

Swim Speed Strokes shows how to master elite technique in all four competitive swimming strokes.

Sheila Taormina is a 4-time Olympian, gold medalist, ITU triathlon world champion, and internationally recognized swimming coach. Learn more about Sheila here or at sheilat.com.